Friday, December 6, 2013

Guest Post: The Works of an Amazing Garden Photographer

Swallowtail Butterfly with Nikon D5100
I have the opportunity and pleasure of sharing the garden photography of Richard Dressner, friend and talented photographer. Rich has had a lifetime passion for being behind the lens of a camera and has become a serious photographer for the past two years.  Inspired by the blooms and visitors to his wife's gardens, he is now embarking deeper into the world of macro photography and the use of various lighting techniques.
"Here's looking at you, kid" with Nikon D5100
 Recently, Rich prefers his Nikon D600 for all photography over his Nikon D5100.  When asked what other lenses he uses for his close ups and long distance shots Rich replies, "I don't have a real maco lens but I use a Nikon prime 50mm f/1.8 lens when I need to get close.  It can focus down to twelve inches from the subject and is sharp enough to allow for deep cropping...  
Cleome Nikon D5100
For more distant subjects I use my Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VRII. It’s a very expensive lens but sharp and bright with outstanding vibration reduction". For general landscape, I use a Nikon 24-85mm. The Nikon D5100 is still a good little camera for travel, etc." 
Lillium 2 Nikon D600
Here are some photographs of the gardens. When asked which type of photography is his favorite Rich replies, "I don't have a favorite, but I do enjoy garden and wildlife shots."
Lillium 2 Nikon D600
With winter approaching, he plans to experiment with mysterious lighting and dabble in studio shots.
Monarch Butterfly Nikon D5100
Enjoy the rest of these amazing photos.  I cannot seem to get enough of them!
Monarch Butterfly Nikon D5100
"Murder in the Garden" Praying mantis and Bumblebee with Nikon D5100

Praying mantis Nikon D600
Praying mantis Nikon D5100
Sedum & Buckeye butterfly with NIkon D5100
Swallowtail Butterfly Nikon D5100
Water lily with Nikon D600
 According to Rich, "Photography is an interest that welcomes everyone. It can be deeply technical, but modern cameras are automated enough to allow people of all skill levels to achieve beautiful results, and flexible enough to grow with the photographer as new skills are acquired and the safety net of automation is no longer needed. If you shoot what you are passionate about, it’s a thrilling and rewarding pursuit."

As Always...Happy Gardening! 
 
Author: Lee@A Guide To Northeastern Gardening, Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. 

21 comments:

  1. The D600 is a faster camera (than his former model) and a good camera for this kind of work. The new D610 has caught my interest for the money. Less than the D800, it is more frames per second and a good refresh rate. It even has a few features of D4. Macro is catching...life a fever. He should look into the Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor Lens.

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    1. Thanks for the info Donna. I agree...macro is catching and I am getting the fever as well! I'll have to check out the lens you mentioned and mention it to my friend. Also thank you about the note on the comments form. It seems to be working alright now. If anyone has problems with it please let me know!

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    2. Donna, I've had my eye on the 105mm macro for a year and a half. Last year, Nikon had a sudden sale a few days before Christmas. Might have to pull the trigger this year. The D600 (now the D610) is very similar in performance to the D800, but the D800 has massive file sizes due to it's higher resolution.

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  2. These shots are beautiful!!! Thank you so much for sharing!!!

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    1. You are welcome. I am glad I was able to share these photographs. He is talented!

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  3. Thanks for the kind words everyone, and thanks to Lee for posting some of my shots. I also have to thank my wife Diane for providing the garden. It was a good excuse to justify the costs of a very expensive hobby.

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    1. Nice job Rich! Now you have another reason to continue with the hobby! Keep trying new things and send some tips my way!

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  4. Podziwiam fotografa, bo zdjęcia są wspaniałe. Pozdrawiam.
    I admire the photographer, because the pictures are great. Yours.

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    1. Thank you Giga. I am sure he will appreciate your kind words.

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  5. Wow! These photos are amazing! It's quite funny - really dislike bugs but I LOVE to see really up-close pictures of them :)

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    1. LOL! I feel the same way...but insects always seem to be amazing in photographs. The praying mantis is especially unusual and interesting and Rich has captured them well!

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  6. Richard Dressner is talented photographer, Lee! And he has a professional camera that allows him to take such beautiful photos. I love the most of butterfly and blooming budlea.
    Have a nice week!

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    1. Thanks for your kind words Nadezda and have a nice week too!

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  7. Beautiful photos and lovely compositions, taking photos of insects is something I haven’t done much of, I prefer flowers – at least they stay and don’t fly away! I have caught some amazing spiders in my garden though, when I get them blown up on my computer afterwards they really fascinate me, and scare me a bit too!

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    1. Rich will appreciate your comments and he sure does have a way of capturing those action shots! I've also had a hard time trying to photograph insects...same problem they fly away!!! I am hoping the new telephoto lens I just purchased will allow me to sneak up on them from a distance!

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  8. I enjoy garden photography too but find a macro lens to be rather awkward to use and achieve good focus. Your painted lady vbutterflies are different to ours - ours don;t have eye spots.

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    1. Hi Sue. Interesting point that you made about the macro lens. My guest photographer (Rich) doesn't even use one to get these clear shots. The zoom on his Nikon along with his eye for photography work just fine. I just purchased a 70-300 mm telephoto lens that I am going to try experimenting with to get some close ups from afar and would really like a macro lens for the detail.... But one thing at a time.

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    2. My camera is a bridge camera - panasonic Lumix and has a wide range from 20-1200 and I set my camera to it's widest angle and get ib really close for flowers such as for these then I play with cropping. Not professional results but I'm practising to get better.

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    3. Good tip...thank you! Photography has become my latest interest and has opened up a whole new avenue to my passion of gardening. The two just go together hand in hand. Keep photographing...I look forward to seeing some more of your shots!

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Thank you for visiting. I love reading your comments and knowing you have been here, and will try to reciprocate on your blog. If you have any questions I will try my very best to answer them. As always...HAPPY GARDENING!

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